Christian Values

Schools and teachers are a major influence on the developing values of children and young people. Children learn values at school from relationships; everyday classroom interactions from the examples set by adults; and, from more formal attempts led by teachers to engage in values education.

Meaning, ethics and vision must shape the practice of education and as a church school we have the responsibility to ground our values in the teachings of the Christian Faith. It is our Christian tradition which gives our values content and the stories we share with children the values' moral substance.

We select 3 Values over the course of the school year to focus on. However, all the values underpin everything we do at Finstock Church of England Primary School and no one value is ever isolated from the others. 

Our Christian Values work within our foundations to help us fulfil our Vision (Providing all children with the highest level of academic curriculum and pastoral care, with opportunities for spiritual growth and intellectual enquiry.) and live out our Mission Statement (Excellence through faith, friendship, courage and respect.) 

 

The Teaching of Values at Finstock Church of England Primary School

These values are ones that are shared by many people in this country because the Christian faith has for centuries been a driving force in our education and legal system and those values have made their mark on our history.

We actively teach our values in all we do. They are the focus of our Collective Worships and our Class Reflection time. They help us develop our strong ethos.

Whilst Finstock Church of England Primary School is a Christian school, we strongly encourage our pupils to regard people of all faiths, races and cultures with respect and tolerance.

 

 

This term's value is Compassion

Compassion (2)

2 Colossians 3.12: Clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience.

Luke 10.25-37: (The story of the Good Samaritan)

Matthew 7.12: Treat others as you want them to treat you.

Spiritual

Jesus' works of healing were always rooted in his compassion for others. In the story he told which is known as the Good Samaritan, the compassion shown is directed toward someone totally unexpected. Jesus was making the point that we are called to care for those outside our own cultural or social circle as well as our friends and family.

The literal meaning of the word ‘compassion’ suggests suffering with or alongside someone else. In developing character, we encourage an attitude of empathy and understanding of others, trying to imagine what it is like to stand in the shoes of another.

Moral

We try to explore what it means to live out Jesus' teaching, exemplified in the command to do to others as you would have them do to you. (Matthew 7. 12) This is sometimes known as The Golden Rule and underpins all our relationships and our Behaviour Policy.

Social

As a community, we try to share one another's burdens and to help everyone to know that struggling and failure are not signs of weakness but opportunities to learn more about ourselves and others, and to grow as an interdependent family. We actively look out for opportunities to support charities and good causes that improve the quality of life for people in our own country and the wider world.

Cultural

We recognise that our nation has, throughout its history, offered a safe place for those fleeing persecution and disaster. We celebrate the rich diversity that this has brought to our culture and seek to play our part in offering a welcome to all those joining our school community especially anyone in any kind of need.John 15.15: ‘I no longer call you servants’, said Jesus.......... ‘Instead I have called you friends.’

 

Last term's value was Friendship.